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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 4  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 30-34

Levels of some electrolytes and glucose in Saudi water pipe smokers


Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

Correspondence Address:
Sawsan Hassan Mahassni
Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Box 42652, Jeddah 21551
Saudi Arabia
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2394-2010.199330

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Background: Water pipe smoking (WPS) is associated with many adverse health effects, diseases, and cancers. Few studies exist on the effects of WPS on the human body and, to our Knowledge, this is the first study on levels of glucose and electrolytes in WP smokers. Aim: This study was done to determine the effects of WPS on concentrations of glucose and some electrolytes in WP smokers compared to concentrations in nonsmokers. Materials and Methods: This study was done on 85 randomly chosen healthy controls (21 female and 21 male WP smokers, and 21 female and 22 male nonWP smokers) with an age range of 20–35 years from Jeddah and Al-Muzaylef, Saudi Arabia. Blood samples were collected to determine the plasma concentrations of K+, Na+, P−3, Mg+2, Ca+2, Cl, and glucose. Results: The results show no significant differences for electrolytes and glucose levels in female and male smokers compared to female and male nonsmokers respectively, with the exception of a significantly higher Cl concentration for male smokers. Comparing female and male smokers, Na+, Mg+2, Ca+2, and glucose concentrations were significantly lower for females, whereas the remaining electrolytes were not significantly different. Comparing female and male nonsmokers, K+, Na+, Ca+2, and glucose concentrations were significantly lower, and Cl concentration was significantly higher in females, while the remaining electrolytes were not significantly different. Conclusion: The data suggest that WPS affects Cl- levels in males and affects K+, Mg+2, and Cl- levels when comparing the differences between female and male smokers with nonsmokers.


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