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 Table of Contents  
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 2  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 19-24

Knowledge of tuberculosis and human immune virus among tuberculosis suspects attending health facilities in Addis Ababa


1 Department of Disease Prevention, Ethiopian Somali Regional Health Bureau, Jimma, Ethiopia
2 Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Jimma University, Jimma, Ethiopia
3 Department of Health Education and Behavioral Science, Jimma University, Jimma, Ethiopia

Date of Web Publication4-Jun-2015

Correspondence Address:
Mr. Nebiyu Negussu Ayele
Department of Disease Prevention, Somali Regional Health Bureau, Jijiga
Ethiopia
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2394-2010.158124

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  Abstract 

Background: Tuberculosis is a major public health problem throughout the world in general and in Ethiopia in particular. In this study, we assess the knowledge of TB suspects about TB and HIV in health facilities of Addis Ababa. Materials and Methods: In the period of February to March, 2009, a cross-sectional survey was done in 27 health centers of Addis Ababa among TB suspects who had cough, and fever for ≥2 weeks. A total of 545 adult pulmonary TB or extrapulmonary TB (TB lymphadenitis) suspects (>15 years) were studied. Information about TB and HIV were collected using pretested questionnaire. Data was collected by trained health professionals and analyzed using SPSS 20.0 statistical software. Result: Most (94.4%) of the TB suspects heard about TB before. A few (12.8%) knew TB can involve other organs other than the lung. Ventilating living room was perceived by 34.6% as a means of reducing TB infection. Suspects who work in the public sector had three times increased odds of being knowledgeable than daily workers (AOR = 3.00, 95% CI: 1.53-5.88, P = 0.001). On the other hand, illiterates had lower odds of being knowledgeable about TB than above 12 graders (AOR = 0.1, 95% CI: 0.03-0.38, P = 0.001). Even if all suspects heard about HIV, still sharing meal (10.7%) and mosquito bite (7.9%) perceived as modes of transmission for HIV infection. Suspects who are 25-34 years old (AOR = 3, 08, 95% CI: 1.4-6.78, P = 0.001) and 35-49 years old (AOR = 2.16, 95% CI: 1.04-4.48, P = 0.033) were more likely to have good knowledge about HIV compared with >50 years old. Conclusion: Overall, suspects heard about TB and HIV before. However, there was less knowledge regarding other forms of TB. Misconception still persists on the area of HIV/AIDS. Hence a comprehensive approach needs to be followed to improve knowledge about TB and misconception about HIV/AIDS.

Keywords: HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, TB lymphadenitis


How to cite this article:
Ayele NN, Taddege AD, kassaye KD, Chaka M, Badei A. Knowledge of tuberculosis and human immune virus among tuberculosis suspects attending health facilities in Addis Ababa. J Health Res Rev 2015;2:19-24

How to cite this URL:
Ayele NN, Taddege AD, kassaye KD, Chaka M, Badei A. Knowledge of tuberculosis and human immune virus among tuberculosis suspects attending health facilities in Addis Ababa. J Health Res Rev [serial online] 2015 [cited 2019 Dec 9];2:19-24. Available from: http://www.jhrr.org/text.asp?2015/2/1/19/158124


  Introduction Top


Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major global health problem. It causes ill-health among millions of people each year and ranks as the second leading cause of death from an infectious disease worldwide, after the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). [1] According to the World Health Organization (WHO) global TB Report 2013, there were 8.6 million new TB cases in 2012 and 1.3 million TB deaths. An estimated 1.1 million (13%) of the 8.6 million people who developed TB in 2012 were HIV positive. About 75% of these cases were in the African region. [1]

The 22 High Burden Countries (HBCs) that have been given highest priority at the global level since 2000 accounted for 81% of all estimated cases worldwide. These countries have been the focus of intensified efforts in Directly Observed Treatment, Short course (DOTS) expansion. [2]

Ethiopia is one of the 22 HBCs. According to the WHO global TB report 2013, there were an estimated 230,000 (183-321 per 100,000) incident cases of TB including HIV positives. In the same year the prevalence of TB was estimated to be 210,000 (180-272, per 100,000). There were an estimated 16,000 deaths (13-23 per 100,000) due to TB, excluding HIV-related deaths. [1]

Among 41 high TB/HIV burden countries in the year 2011 there were about 38000 HIV-positive new TB cases in Ethiopia. Among 65,140 TB patients who were screened for HIV infection, 5,442 were found to be positive for HIV infection. [2]

Delay in TB diagnosis may lead to progression of disease leading to increased mortality and enhanced TB transmission in the community. Reports have indicated that patients become more contagious as the delay progresses. [3] Treatment delay, which mainly results from delayed diagnosis, is one of the major challenges of TB control programs in developing countries. [4],[5],[6] It is particularly important in a high HIV prevalence setting like Ethiopia, [7],[8] where persons with HIV infection are at high risk of developing TB.

Studies in different countries report that knowledge about TB is affected by socioeconomic variables, [9],[10],[11] Low awareness, [12],[13],[14] income, [15] illiteracy, [12] gender, [14],[16],[17] and marital status. [13] Here we report results of knowledge on tuberculosis and HIV among TB suspects in public health facilities in Addis Ababa. This information will help to understand the level of knowledge of tuberculosis suspects and factor affecting it.


  Materials and methods Top


Setting and period

The study was carried out from February to March, 2009, in -27 public health centers (primary health care units) in Addis Ababa, the capital city of the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia. The population of the city was estimated at 2.9 million. [18] There were 27 government health centers in the city and all of them participated in the study.

Study design

A facility based cross-sectional study was conducted in 27 health centers in Addis Ababa.

Study population and sampling

Study participants were 545 adult pulmonary TB or extrapulmonary TB (TB lymphadenitis) suspects (>15 years) identified in the study health centers. Considering resources, the sample size was estimated using a single proportion sample size formulae by considering the following parameters: Prevalence of TB among adult pulmonary TB suspects of 29%, [19] 95% CI, and 4% of margin of error and 10% for the nonresponse rate.

The total sample size was distributed equally among 27 health centers. From each health centers 20 patients were consecutively recruited, except in 5 health centers where 21 patients recruited. If he or she refused to be involved in the study, the next eligible attendee was approached.

Measurement

TB suspects were identified using a pre-tested questionnaire. TB suspects were defined as individuals who had cough of >2 weeks OR two or more of the following symptoms: Weight loss, fever, excessive night sweats, and painless swelling of cervical or auxiliary lymph nodes of more than 2 weeks. [20] Diagnosis of TB and HIV was based on the national guideline and the detail procedure is published elsewhere. [21]

Information concerning the sociodemographic and knowledge of patients on TB and HIV was collected by trained general practitioners or nurses using a pretested and previously used questionnaire. [5] The questionnaire was originally developed in English and translated to Amharic (local language). To ensure consistency, the questionnaire was retranslated to English by another person who was blind to the original questionnaire. The overall knowledge of TB and HIV were assessed by scoring system. A score of one was given to correct responses, zero being used for incorrect/do not know responses. The mean value was used to categorize study participants into two categories. Score less than the mean value was considered as low knowledge, whereas score greater than the mean value was considered as good knowledge. [22] Accordingly, study participants who scored above the mean value (11.52) of the 23 questions for knowledge of TB were categorized as knowledgeable. Similarly, the mean value (11.85) of 17 questions about knowledge of HIV was used to categorize the study participants into two categories.

Data analysis

Data were entered into SPSS Version 20.0 statistical software. Univariate analysis was done to describe the sociodemographic characteristics, knowledge of TB, and knowledge of HIV. Outcome variables (knowledge about TB, and knowledge toward HIV) were dichotomized. Sociodemographic characteristics of the study participants were major independent variables. Whereas knowledge of TB and HIV were dependants. The data analyses was based on logistic regression.

First univariate analysis was conducted to see possible association and to estimate the crude OR, the different independent variables were fitted univariately to assess their independent effect in terms of the crude odds ratio and its 95% confidence interval (CI). Next, a stepwise multivariate logistic regression model was fitted containing all the independent variables that showed a significant effect in the univariate analysis at the 5% significance level, leading to adjusted odds ratio and their 95% confidence intervals.

Ethical consideration

Ethical clearance was obtained from the ethical committee of Jimma University and Addis Ababa health bureau. Written consent was obtained from each participants and confidentiality was assured for all the information provided. Identification of a participant was only through numerical codes.


  Results Top


Sociodemographic characteristics of the study participants

A total of 506 suspects involved in the analysis, the rest 39 (7.2%) were excluded due to incomplete result on major outcome variables. The mean age was 35 years, minimum 15 maximum 82 (SD = 13.9). Majority (70.9%), of the study participants were Orthodox Christian by religion and the predominant job was daily laborer (40.3%). [Table 1] shows the sociodemographic characteristics of the study participants.
Table 1: Demographic and social characteristics of TB suspects in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, June, 2009 (n=506)


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Knowledge of study participants about TB

Majority (94.4%) of the suspects heard about TB before coming to the health facility. Most (83.6%) knew TB can affect lung; however, only (12.8%) knew TB can involve other organs other than the lung. Pertaining to the mode of transmission, most (74.5%) knew TB is transmitted by air droplets and only (14.6%) knew that it could be transmitted by drinking raw milk. Long-lasting cough was perceived by majority (77.5%) of suspects as a symptom of TB. On the other hand, only (34.6%) knew ventilating living room can reduce the risk of TB infection.

Crude and adjusted effects of selected covariates obtained from logistic regression are summarized in [Table 2] for the overall knowledge about TB. Suspects who work at a public sector had three times higher odds of being knowledgeable than daily workers (AOR = 3.00, 95% CI: 1.53-5.88, P = 0.001). Illiterates had lesser odd of being knowledgeable about TB than those who attend above 12 grades (AOR = 0.1, 95% CI: 0.03-0.38, P = 0.001) [Table 2].
Table 2: Association of TB suspects sociodemographic characteristics with knowledge about TB in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, June, 2009 (n=506)


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Knowledge of study participants about HIV/AIDS

All (100%) of the study participants herd about HIV, and most (95.8%) suspects believe HIV is contagious. Sharing meal (10.7%) and mosquito bite (7.9%) were perceived as HIV transmission routes. Moreover, unprotected sex and breast feeding from known HIV-infected mother mentioned by (77.3%) and (26.9%) of the suspects, respectively.

Abstaining from sexual intercourse (70%) and using condom (49.4%) mentioned as a prevention of HIV infection. Around (31.2%) of suspects believe antiretroviral therapy (ART) can cure HIV/AIDS patients.

Those who are in the age category 25-34 were three times higher odd of being more knowledgeable than age >50 (AOR = 3, 08, 95% CI: 1.4-6.78, P = 0.001). Similarly, age 35-49 years are 2.16 times more likely to have a good knowledge than >50 (AOR = 2.16, 95% CI: 1.04-4.48, P = 0.033). Suspects who are married had lesser odds of being knowledgeable than divorced (AOR = 0.55, 95% CI: 0.31-0.98, P = 0.98). On the other hand, merchant suspects have a good knowledge than daily workers (AOR = 1.89, 95% CI: 1.03-3.46, P = 0.98) [Table 3].
Table 3: Association of TB suspects sociodemographic characteristics with knowledge about HIV in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, June, 2009 (n=506)


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  Discussion Top


In this study, several important findings were observed. Majority (94.4%) of the suspects ever heard about TB before; however, only 12.8% recognize TB can involve other organs other than the lung. Few of the suspects, 14.6%, aware TB is transmitted by drinking of raw milk, whereas 74.5% know TB transmitted by air droplets of infected person. Long-lasting cough perceived by 77.5% as a sign and symptom of TB. Ventilating a living room as a means of reducing the risk of TB infection indicated by 34.6% of suspect's. On the other hand, all suspects heard about acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) before. Half of the suspects mention use of condom serves as a means of HIV prevention. Very few, 7.9% suspects believe mosquito bite can transmit HIV infection. Education and occupational status were associated with knowledge of TB, and only age was a predictor of comprehensive knowledge about HIV/AIDS.

The finding about ever heard TB before in our study is consistent with previous reports in Afar (A) (95.6%) other parts of Ethiopia, [23],[24] Vietnam, [25] Tanzania, [26] and Kenya. [27] In this study, only few 14.6% know TB is transmitted by drinking of raw milk; however, majority 74.5% recognize TB transmitted by air droplets of infected person. Besides 34.6% distinguish ventilating a living room can reduce the risk of TB infection, 77.5% aware long-lasting cough as a symptom of TB, which is comparable to previous reports from this country, [23],[24],[28] and Tanzania, [29] nevertheless, lower than the findings of study conducted in Afar. [30]

Suspects who work at a public sectors had three times higher odds of being knowledgeable than daily workers (AOR = 3.00, 95% CI: 1.53-5.88, P = 0.001). Likewise, illiterates had lesser odds of being knowledgeable about TB than those who attend grade 12 and above (AOR = 0.1, 95% CI: 0.03-0.38, P = 0.001), which is consistent with the study done in India, West Bengal. [31]

On the other side, all suspects heard about HIV/AIDS before, which is in agreement with the 2011 Ethiopian demography and health survey report (EDHS). Our finding 49.4% believes use of condom can reduce HIV infection is lower than India 68%, [31] and EDHS report in Addis Ababa (82.4% females and 94.1% males). [32] This difference shows great change in knowledge of condom as a means of HIV prevention over time due to intensification of health education.

As a part of the effort to assess HIV/AIDS knowledge, we obtain common misconceptions about the transmission. Around 7.9% suspects in our study believe mosquito bite can transmit HIV infection, which is lower than, EDHS report 34.1% females and 29.3% males. [32]

The result age category 25-34 were three times had higher odd of being more knowledgeable than age >50 (AOR = 3, 08, 95% CI: 1.4-6.78, P = 0.001) similarly age 35-49 years are 2.16 times more likely to have a good knowledge than >50 (AOR = 2.16, 95% CI: 1.04-4.48, P = 0.033), this might be due to high exposure of adults to different social medias, however these findings were incongruity with 2011 EDHS report. [32]

Inclusion of all the health centers in Addis Ababa, use of primary data, and adequate sample size are some of the strength of this study. However, not measure previous history of TB status, which might have implication for the finding.


  Conclusion Top


Greater parts of suspects ever heard about TB and HIV before. However, less awareness on other forms of TB, boiling raw milk and ventilating room as a means of TB prevention. Educational status and occupational status were predictors of knowledge about TB. Accepting condom as HIV prevention is low and misconception on HIV/AIDS mode of transmission and ART rationale were high. Hence a comprehensive approach on the behavioral domains needs to be followed to improve knowledge about TB and misconception about HIV/AIDS.


  Acknowledgments Top


The authors acknowledge the study participants and health institutions for their unreserved support to give the necessary information.

 
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